Bring Me The Horizon reflect on how Linkin Park’s ‘Hybrid Theory’ influenced their sound: “We still reference them”

Bring Me The Horizon‘s Jordan Fish has opened up on how Linkin Park‘s ‘Hybrid Theory’ influenced the band’s sound.

The nu-metal band’s seminal debut album will celebrate its 20th anniversary later this month, and is widely regarded as one of the most influential records from the genre.

In a new NME interview to mark the milestone, Fish said that the record’s far-reaching influence can be heard on every album from the Sheffield band.

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“Even with the record we’re doing right now, we still reference them. They’re one of those bands that I always have in the back of my mind when we’re thinking about where a song should go next,” he said.

Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington (Credit: Getty)

“It’s the Bible for heavy, catchy music that combines electronic and pop music, which is our brief. They just covered so much ground and did it with such class on that album.”

Fish added: “Linkin Park weren’t really a macho band, were they? It was rebellious, but they still had universal songs like ‘In The End’ that your mum could enjoy on the radio. A lot of songs from that era were straight-up ‘Fuck everyone!’ bro anger, but Linkin Park were a lot more emo and introspective. They didn’t have that silly aggression that a lot of nu-metal bands had; they were talking about depression.”

It comes after Linkin Park marked the anniversary by releasing a “lost” song ‘Pictureboard’ as part of their new re-issued edition of the record.







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The track stems from a time when the band were known as Xero. Previously, fans knew that ‘Pictureboard’ existed but, apart from some suspecting to have heard it as an interval track during a live performance, none have been able to hear it on record.

The ‘Hybrid Theory: 20th Anniversary Edition’ release also includes 12 previously unreleased tracks from the early noughties, an 80-page book, a cassette reproduction of a two-track street team sampler, lithographs, a replica tour laminate, and a poster of the late Chester Bennington, as well as several demos.

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