Rostam announces ‘Changephobia’ remix series

Rostam has announced an extensive remix series for his 2021 solo album ‘Changephobia’, with the first part out now.

  • READ MORE: Rostam – ‘Changephobia’ review: a new spin on the Vampire Weekend sound

The former Vampire Weekend multi-instrumentalist released his second solo album in June. The first part of the remix project features four tracks, including A.G. Cook‘s take on ‘Kinney’ and A.K. Paul’s version of ‘These Kids We Knew’. Billy Lemos has also reworked ‘From The Back of a Cab’. Elsewhere, there’s a backyard version of ‘4Runner’.

Listen to ‘Changephobia Remixes: Part I’ below:

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A second part of the project has been confirmed for release on December 1, though the tracklisting has yet to be confirmed.

Soon after the release of ‘Changephobia’, which follows on from Rostam’s 2017 debut solo record ‘Half-Light’, Rostam released a deluxe version that featured covers of The Clash’s ‘Train In Vain’ and Lucinda Williams’ ‘Fruits of My Labour’.

Speaking about the original record, Rostam said: “Transphobia, biphobia, homophobia— these words hold a weight of threat, and it occurred to me that the threats they bare— the fears they describe— are rooted in a fear of change: a fear of the unknown, of a future that is not yet familiar, one in which there is a change of traditions, definitions, and distributions of power.”

He added: “So gender, too, was on my mind while creating this album, as I came to find myself writing about love and connection but not wanting to place relationships in a gendered context.

“This collection of songs is not celebrating a fear of change. Rather, it’s the opposite. It’s about who we are capable of becoming if we recognize these fears in ourselves and rise above them.”

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Reviewing ‘Changephobia’, NME wrote: “Fans of Vampire Weekend will find traces of the band’s distinctive art pop sound throughout the album, particularly in the first track ‘These Kids We Knew’. The nostalgic vibe and experimental rhythms are similar to his bands classics, such as 2013’s ‘Unbelievers’, but with Rostam’s own distinctive sound threaded throughout.”