Watch Holly Humberstone team up with Griff for ‘Friendly Fire’

Holly Humberstone has teamed up with Griff for a live “Emotional Grim Reaper” rendition of ‘Friendly Fire’ – watch the performance below.

  • READ MORE: Holly Humberstone: haunting synth-pop to soundtrack coming-of-age anxiety

The performance was recorded at London’s Session Arts Club earlier this week and will be followed up with a collaboration between Humberstone and Bombay Bicycle Club’s Jack Steadman in the coming weeks.

“Was so lovely to have Griff create a version of ‘Friendly Fire’ with me at Session Arts Club,” said Humberstone about the collaboration. “She’s such a special artist. Thank u Sarah for doing this with me.”

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‘Friendly Fire’ is taken from Humberstone’s recent EP ‘The Walls Are Way Too Thin’ which was released last week (November 12).

Speaking about the track, Humberstone said: “​​I wrote this song on a very confusing holiday in autumn of last year. It was meant to be some time to heal but it became an agonising period of overthinking about the relationship I was in.”

“I was very stressed because I knew the relationship was good and just couldn’t understand what was wrong with me or why I was having these weird confusing feelings. I felt I needed to get it off my chest and this song was my way of saying ‘if I do hurt you in the future then I never meant to and I’m sorry’.”

Watch the performance below:

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Griff recently released ‘One Night’, the first single since her debut mixtape ‘One Foot In Front Of The Other’ came out in June. The singer/producer has also announced a mammoth tour of the UK, US and Europe for 2022.

“I have the most creative control so nothing gets released without me feeling 100% happy about it,” Griff told NME earlier this year. “But at the same time you’re attached to a huge machine, so it definitely isn’t at the pace I’d like it to be. I released a lot of music in the last year and sometimes it felt like, ‘am I releasing my best songs and no-one’s listening to them?’”







“With how content is consumed and attention spans are at the moment, you’re always creatively exhausted because you have to release a song every six weeks to keep people’s attention,” said Griff.

“And even with this seven-song EP, everyone’s now asking when the album campaign starts. I’m like ‘fucking hell’. I haven’t got that many songs in me,” she added.